RECOMMENDED ROUTES OF KANAZAWA

plan_b_course_img.jpg

plan_b_01.jpgMyoryuji Temple (Ninjadera Temple)
Our starting point today is Myoryuji Temple, a popular tourist spot situated in Teramachi Temple District and well known as the “Ninja Temple.”
“It’s associated with ninja?” asked Wellington. No, this 360-year-old temple actually has nothing to do with ninja.
The three temple districts in Kanazawa, including Teramachi, were built as part of the Kaga clan’s defense strategy. The Maeda family, the rulers of the region during the Edo period, added a number of functions to Myoryuji Temple so that it would work as a lookout post and fort. And this is how the temple earned its nickname.
A guided tour inside this secretive temple showed Wellington the hidden tunnels, secret rooms, traps, and a labyrinth of staircases designed to combat enemy invasion.

*Reservations are required to see the inside of the temple. A guide will take you around on an approx. 30-minute tour.
Web : http://www.myouryuji.or.jp/en.html

plan_b_02.jpgSeisonkaku Villa
After strolling around Teramachi, designated as one of Japan’s Important Groups of Traditional Buildings, head for Seisonkaku Villa.
Seisonkaku Villa was built at the corner of Kenrokuen Garden, in 1863, for the mother of the 13th lord of the Kaga Clan, Nariyasu Maeda. Designated as a National Important Cultural Asset, the villa is a two-story building, with the first floor constructed in the shoin style and the second floor in the sukiya style. The interior space contains valuable architecture and craftworks and is one of the richest architectural heritage sites in Kanazawa. Wellington took a liking to the exterior with its massive gate and white namako-kabe walls, enjoying the quiet ambience with very few people.
From here it’s a short walk to the entrance to Kenrokuen Garden.

Web : http://www.seisonkaku.com/english/index.html

plan_b_03.jpgKenrokuen Garden
Miyoshi-an is an old established ryotei restaurant standing by the pond within the acres of Kenrokuen Garden.
“I didn’t know there was a ryotei in the garden,” said Wellington, having already been in Kanazawa for a number of years. This restaurant is really off the beaten path for those who want to eat local cuisine in an exclusive environment. He enjoyed a bento boxed lunch while admiring the beautiful scenery and the atmosphere with the comforting sound of the waterfall.

Web : http://www.pref.ishikawa.jp/siro-niwa/kenrokuen/e/index.html

plan_b_04.jpgLunch in Kenrokuen Garden
Miyoshi-an is an old established ryotei restaurant standing by the pond within the acres of Kenrokuen Garden.
“I didn’t know there was a ryotei in the garden,” said Wellington, having already been in Kanazawa for a number of years. This restaurant is really off the beaten path for those who want to eat local cuisine in an exclusive environment. He enjoyed a bento boxed lunch while admiring the beautiful scenery and the atmosphere with the comforting sound of the waterfall.

Web : http://www.miyoshian.net

plan_b_05.jpgKanazawa Castle Park
As you leave Kenrokuen Garden, cross the bridge and pass through the imposing Ishikawa-mon Gate into Kanazawa Castle Park.
Kanazawa Castle is the fortress where Lord Maeda worked and lived with his family. The first feudal lord, Maeda Toshiie, earnestly began building work on the castle in 1583. Sadly, however, some parts of the castle have been destroyed over the centuries in a number of fires. Some of the buildings have since been rebuilt and restored during the modern time.
“Those current buildings are designed based on how they looked in the 1850s,” we explained to Wellington as we walked past a complex of three buildings: the Hishiyagura tower, Gojukken Nagaya armory, and Hashizume-mon Tsuzuki Yagura tower. “It’s fun to think about the lifestyle of the samurai in those days,” he said.
Gyokusen-in-maru Garden, Maeda’s private garden originally built in 1634 in the chisen-kaiyu style, has also been reconstructed.

Web : http://www.pref.ishikawa.jp/siro-niwa/kanazawajou/e/index.html

plan_b_06.jpgNaga-machi Buke Yashiki District
Leave Kanazawa Castle Park through the Gyokusen-in-maru Gate and head for Nagamachi, where the samurai and their families used to reside. As you will probably notice along the way, the district is located at the foot of the former Kanazawa Castle.
We talked about how cleverly this castle town was constructed, situated as it is between the Asanogawa and Saigawa rivers and with a labyrinthine layout centered around the castle.
Walking through the mud-walled streets and seeing the stone-paved alleys and water canals, Wellington says, “I feel as if I’m back in the samurai era.”

plan_b_07.jpgplan_b_07.jpgNomura Samurai House
One of the main attractions of Nagamachi is Nomura Samurai House. Located in the middle of the district’s main street, it serves as a reminder of how the samurai lived, and it received two stars in the Michelin Guide.
The private gardens in this district were originally designed to have a stream of water entering into them from the canal. The Nomura family’s small garden, ranked as the third-best Japanese garden by a US-based technical journal, is no exception. You cannot help but be overwhelmed by the clever design techniques used to create such perfect beauty in such a small space.
After appreciating the garden from the first floor, try a cup of matcha green tea on the second floor. The corridor leading to the second floor is also pretty interesting.
Although Wellington is not good at seiza, the Japanese way of formal sitting, he really enjoyed the tea and confectionery as well as the view from the classical tea ceremony room.
He concluded by saying, “Although a great number of defense traps were installed all over Kanazawa’s castle town, the Edo period must have basically been an era of peace.”

Web : http://www.nomurake.com

Other Recommended Facilities

plan_b_08.jpgNishi Chaya District
The Nishi Chaya District is one of the three geisha (traditional female Japanese entertainers) districts of Kanazawa, and located 500 m away from the Saigawa Ohashi Bridge in the central part of the city. The Kanazawa Nishi Chaya Shiryokan Museum is a building reproducing a chaya house, where you can see the guest room of the chaya house.

plan_b_09.jpgMaeda Tosanokami-ke Shiryokan Museum
Open : 9:30 am to 5 pm (Visitors must enter by 4:30 pm.) - Open 365 days a year
Admission fee : 300 yen
Address : 2-10-17 Kata-machi
Tel : 076-261-0806
Web : http://www.kanazawa-museum.jp/maedatosa/

plan_b_10.jpgThe Old Site of Mr. Kurando Terashima’s House
Open : 9:30 am 5:00 pm (Visitors must enter by 4:30 pm.) - Closed : Dec. 29 to Jan. 3
Admission fee : 300 yen per adulti; 200 yen per le persone di più di 65; gratuito per le persone di studenti dalle scuole media superiori in giù
Address : 10-3 Ote-machi
Contact : Tel. 076-224-2789; fax. 076-224-2789
Web : http://www.kanazawa-museum.jp/terashima/

plan_b_11.jpgKanazawa Noh Museum
Open : 10 am to 6 pm (Visitors must enter by 5:30 pm) - Closed : Mondays (Next day if Monday falls on a holiday) and Dec. 29 to Jan. 3.
Admission fee : Adult : 300 yen; group (20 persons min.) : 250 yen per person; person of 65 years old or over : 200 yen; person below high-school age : Free
Address : 1-2-25 Hirosaka
Contact : Tel. 076-220-2790, fax.076-220-2791
Web : http://www.kanazawa-noh-museum.gr.jp

plan_b_12.jpgKAGA-HONDA MUSEUM (Ishikawa Prefectural Museum of History)
Open : 9 am to 5 pm (Visitors must enter by 4:30 pm) - Closed : Thursday (Dec. to Feb.) and Dec. 29 to Jan. 3.
Admission fee : Adult : 400 yen; group (20 persons min.) : 350 yen per person; University students : 300 yen; person below high-school age : Free
Address : 3-1 Dewa-machi
Contact : Tel. 076-261-0500, fax.076-261-0525
Web : http://honda-museum.jp

plan_b_13.jpgTentokuin Temple
Open : 9 am to 4:30 pm (until 4 pm from December to February) - Closed : Wednesdays from Dec. to Feb., Dec. 29 to Jan. 3
Admission fee : Adult : 500 yen; junior high school student: 300 yen; schoolchildren: 200 yen; *A 10% discount for a group of 30 or more people.
Address : 4-4-4 Kodatsuno
Contact : Tel. 076-231-4484, fax. 076-223-6633
Web : http://tentokuin.arunke.biz

Samurai Walk Map